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Our Reports

Since 2003 Mind in Harrow has conducted several needs assessments with local BME and faith communities into their different cultural perspectives on mental health and their recommendations for improvement and changes to services. We have collated all the reports of these needs assessments below which have been commissioned, conducted and developed in collaboration with NHS Harrow PCT, Kings Fund and UCLAN

Nedaye Zan Afghan Women Mental Health Promotion Project

Date: October 2015
Author(s): Heather Wilkinson, director of Economic Change CIC
Funded by: Comic Relief

Description: This report presents the findings of an independent evaluation conducted with the Nedaye Zan Afghan Women Mental Health Promotion Project covering the first two and a half years 2013-16. ‘Nedaye Zan’ means ‘Voices of Women’, which is the focus of the project which aims to empower Afghan women to have a voice with in the community by increasing their awareness of mental health services and to have a better understanding of mental health, overcome cultural stigma and improve access to support services.  A part-time Project Coordinator developed the following activities: Established a User-led Steering Group meetings; recruited and trained Volunteer Peer Advocates; delivered fortnightly Mental health/anti-stigma workshops supported by Volunteer Peer Advocates; engaged NHS/social welfare service professionals via workshops.

Nedaye Zan Evaluation Report

Olole Isbedel Post Conference Report

Date: February 2015
Author(s): Josie Hinton
Funded by: Trust for London

Description: In February 2015, Mind in Harrow hosted a pan-London conference which transferred learnings across London about Mind in Harrow’s ‘Olole Isbedel’ campaign; an innovative campaign highlighting the Somali community’s experience of multiple disadvantage, including extreme poverty and severe mental ill health, which is inextricably linked to over representation in the criminal justice system.  The conference also launched a local evidence base which attempts to explain the root causes of the Somali communities’ over representation in acute mental health services and the criminal justice system.  The conference explored this local evidence base with reference to the recommendations made in the Bradley Report and the Department of Health’s Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat.  This report summarises the conference activities, learnings and the experiences of delegates.

Olole Isbedel Post Conference Report.pdf

Olole Isbedel Local Enquiry Report.pdf

The speakers' presentations can also be viewed here:

Review of NHS primary and secondary care services in Harrow 2013-14 

Date: March 2014
Author(s): Harrow User Group (HUG) Reps, Raksha Pandya User Involvement Coordinator, Rajvi Kotecha HUG Data Analyst Assistant
Funded by: NHS Harrow Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG)

Description: During 2013, the User Involvement Coordinator supported Harrow User Group Reps (HUG Reps) to devise a questionnaire based on the North West London CCG Adult Mental Health Strategy priorities. The three areas agreed to be consulted on were 

1) ‘Hospital and inpatient care’ with a focus on Care Programme Approach (CPA),

2) ‘Enhanced mental health care in primary care’ and 

3) ‘Recovery and rehabilitation’. 

The views and feedback from over 150 service users via questionnaires and focus groups were collated and summarised in the form of charts and key themes. This report outlines the main findings from the quantitative and qualitative data and sets out a number of recommendations against the three areas consulted on.

Harrow User Group Review Report & Recommendations

Hayaan Somali Mental Health Promotion Project Programme

Date: January 2013
Author(s): Heather Wilkinson, director of Economic change working with ACEVO Consulting
Funded by: Department of Health Volunteering Fund

Description: This project conducted an independent evaluation of the Hayaan Somali Mental Health Promotion Project Programme delivered over two and a half years 2010-13, which was funded by a combination of Department of Health Volunteering Fund, Trust for London and the Social Action Fund.  The Hayaan Project trained members of the Somali community to run fortnightly information and support workshops, which also engaged professionals to learn about Somali culture and beliefs.  The project expanded into Brent in collaboration with Brent Mind in 2012. The report evaluates the project’s impact against its original intended outcomes and makes recommendations for future development of the project.

Haayan Evaluation Report

Head for work 

Date: November 2010 
Author(s): Heather Wilkinson, director of Economic change working with ACEVO Consulting
Funded by: Big Lottery Fund 

Description: This project conducted an independent evaluation of the Head for Work Programme delivered over three years 2009-12, which was funded by a Big Lottery Reaching Communities Grant. The Head for Work Programme aims to increase training and employment opportunities for people with long-term mental health problems, who are unemployed. Head for Work had three elements: 1) Expert Perspectives in Training (EPIT), a train the trainer course accredited by the University of Westminster, 2) TrainAware, mental health awareness sessions delivered by graduates of EPIT, 3) Future Prospectus, 1:1 and group support for EPIT graduates to help them progress into further education, training and employment opportunities. The report evaluates the project’s impact against its original intended outcomes and makes recommendations for future development of the project.. 

Head for Work Final Report

Somali Advocacy Research Project

Date: November 2010
Author(s): Dr Natalie Tobert, Josie Hinton
Funded by: King’s Fund 

Description: The project evaluated the ‘cultural brokerage’ approach to advocacy with Somali mental health service users, carers and professionals in the borough of Harrow. It explored whether advocacy resulted in improved Somali access to mental health services and improved professional interaction with Somali people. The research explored whether the family model of advocacy was perceived to be beneficial both by the Somali community and by mental health professionals. The report makes recommendations for future policy and practice.

Somali Project Report

Bridging Cultures, Dissolving Barriers (‘People Like Us’ Campaign - Mental Health Promotion with BME Communities)

Date: 2009/2010
Author(s): Dr Natalie Tobert
Funded by: NHS Harrow PCT

Description: A report evaluating the BME mental health promotion workshops programme during 2009-10 and recording the experiences of workshop participants, a continuation of the ‘People Like Us’ Campaign.

Bridging Cultures Executive Summary

Bridging Cultures Main Report

Bridging Cultures Appendices

People Like Us Campaign 2008-09

Date: April 2009
Author(s): Forster for Change
Funded by: NHS Harrow PCT

Description: Evaluation of social marketing intervention, which was designed to increase awareness of mental health and services among BME communities in Harrow

People Like Us Campaign Evaluation

People Like Us Campaign 2008-09

Date: 17th November 2008
Author(s): Forster for Change
Funded by: NHS Harrow PCT

Description: Plan for a social marketing intervention to increase awareness of mental health and services among BME communities in Harrow

Forster People Like Us Campaign Report

People Like Us Signposting Booklet

Date: December 2008
Author(s): Dr Natalie Tobert and Mark Gillham
Funded by: NHS Harrow

Description: To signpost culturally appropriate treatment for BME populations in Harrow, both from the statutory and voluntary sectors.
To offer a brief summary of the history of migration of various populations residing in Harrow.
To offer inspiration through a selection of religious texts, that may help any person’s mental wellbeing.

People Like Us Signposting Booklet

Mental Health Needs Assessment with Black and Minority Ethnic Communities

Date: 1st September 2008
Author(s): Dr Natalie Tobert
Funded by: NHS Harrow PCT

Description: The report assesses the mental health needs of BME groups living in Harrow and explores strategies to improve mental health and reduce the health inequalities within these communities.

BME Mental Health Needs Assessment Report

Community Led Research Project focussing on Gujarati-speaking Asian Elders’ Experiences/Views and Attitudes of Mental Health and Mental Health Services in Harrow

Date: May 2008
Author(s): Arvind Joshi, Damyanti Parmar and Janet Smith  

Description: This report explores Gujarati-speaking Asian elders’ understanding and perceptions of mental health and the services available in the Borough of Harrow.

The project followed the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) Model of Community Engagement. This meant that the research was conducted by members of the Gujarati speaking community, who were trained and supported in their work by UCLan. The project was one of 80 similar projects conducted across England during 2005-2008, exploring issues relating to the government’s Delivering Race Equality in Mental Health Care Strategy.

Asian Elders Community Led Research Project Report

Mapping health access for Afghan, Iranian and Somali refugees and asylum seekers in Harrow 

Date: October and November of 2003
Author(s): Daniel Wasp, Alison Noel, Ibrahim Farah and Dr Dad Mohammed Habib  

Description: To highlight gaps in service provision & barriers faced by refugees and asylum seekers in accessing healthcare and to identify the routes refugees and asylum seekers take into health care and also identify where best to target resources and make a series of recommendations to service providers

Report on mapping health access for Afghan, Iranian and Somali refugees and asylum seekers in Harrow

Acknowledgments

In each of these reports there are many acknowledgements and expressions of thanks for the generous support given by organisations, service users and carers without whose commitment and participation the learning from these valuable reports would not possible.