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Our reports & publications

Read or download about what we’ve being doing.

Nedaye Zan Afghan Women Mental Health Promotion Project – Enquiry Report 2016

Date: February 2017
Author(s): Emily Danby, Mind in Harrow
Funded by: Comic Relief

Description: This report presents the findings of enquiry during 2016 into the barriers experienced by Afghan women to access to health, education and employment services in Harrow. ‘Nedaye Zan’ means ‘Voices of Women’, which is the focus of the project which aims to empower Afghan women to have a voice with in the community by increasing their awareness of mental health services and to have a better understanding of mental health, overcome cultural stigma and improve access to support services. The report summarises the results of over 100 questionnaires completed by Afghan women and several face-to-face interviews to recommend actions to improve access.

Hayaan Somali Mental Health Promotion Project Programme

Date: January 2017
Author(s): Heather Wilkinson, Director of Economic Change CIC
Funded by: Henry Smith Trust and Mind

Description: This report presents the findings of an independent evaluation of the Hayaan Somali Mental Health Promotion Project Programme delivered over three years 2015-17, which was funded by a combination of Henry Smith Trust, Mind, Trust for London and Awards for All. The Hayaan Project trained members of the Somali community to run fortnightly information and support workshops in Harrow and Brent, which also engaged professionals to learn about Somali culture and beliefs. The report evaluates the project’s impact against its original intended outcomes and makes recommendations for future development of the project.

Head for Work

Date: August 2016
Author(s): Heather Wilkinson, Director of Economic Change CIC, working with ACEVO Consulting
Funded by: Big Lottery Fund

Description: This report presents an independent evaluation of the Head for Work Programme delivered over two years 2004-16, which was funded by a Big Lottery Fund Reaching Communities grant. The Head for Work Programme aims to increase training and employment opportunities for people with long-term mental health problems, who are unemployed. Head for Work had three elements:
1. LEARN, a train the trainer course accredited by the University of Westminster,
2. TRAIN, mental health awareness sessions delivered by graduates of LEARN,
3. ADVANCE, 1:1 and group support for LEARN graduates to help them progress into further education, training and employment opportunities.
The report evaluates the project’s impact against its original intended outcomes and makes recommendations for future development of the project.

Nedaye Zan Afghan Women Mental Health Promotion Project

Date: October 2015
Author(s): Heather Wilkinson, director of Economic Change CIC
Funded by: Comic Relief

Description: This report presents the findings of an independent evaluation conducted with the Nedaye Zan Afghan Women Mental Health Promotion Project covering the first two and a half years 2013-16. ‘Nedaye Zan’ means ‘Voices of Women’, which is the focus of the project which aims to empower Afghan women to have a voice with in the community by increasing their awareness of mental health services and to have a better understanding of mental health, overcome cultural stigma and improve access to support services. A part-time Project Coordinator developed the following activities:
• Established a User-led Steering Group meetings;
• Recruited and trained Volunteer Peer Advocates;
• Delivered fortnightly Mental health/anti-stigma workshops supported by Volunteer Peer Advocates;
• Engaged NHS/social welfare service professionals via workshops.

Olole Isbedel Post Conference Report

Date: February 2015
Author(s): Josie Hinton
Funded by: Trust for London

Description: In February 2015, Mind in Harrow hosted a pan-London conference which transferred learnings across London about Mind in Harrow’s ‘Olole Isbedel’ campaign; an innovative campaign highlighting the Somali community’s experience of multiple disadvantage, including extreme poverty and severe mental ill health, which is inextricably linked to over representation in the criminal justice system. The conference also launched a local evidence base which attempts to explain the root causes of the Somali communities’ over representation in acute mental health services and the criminal justice system. The conference explored this local evidence base with reference to the recommendations made in the Bradley Report and the Department of Health’s Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat. This report summarises the conference activities, learnings and the experiences of delegates.

Review of NHS primary and secondary care services in Harrow 2013-14

Date: March 2014
Author(s): Harrow User Group (HUG) Reps, Raksha Pandya User Involvement Coordinator, Rajvi Kotecha HUG Data Analyst Assistant
Funded by: NHS Harrow Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG)

Description: During 2013, the User Involvement Coordinator supported Harrow User Group Reps (HUG Reps) to devise a questionnaire based on the North West London CCG Adult Mental Health Strategy priorities. The three areas agreed to be consulted on were:
1. ‘Hospital and inpatient care’ with a focus on Care Programme Approach (CPA),
2. ‘Enhanced mental health care in primary care’ and
3. ‘Recovery and rehabilitation’.
The views and feedback from over 150 service users via questionnaires and focus groups were collated and summarised in the form of charts and key themes. This report outlines the main findings from the quantitative and qualitative data and sets out a number of recommendations against the three areas consulted on.

Hayaan Somali Mental Health Promotion Project Programme

Date: January 2013
Author(s): Heather Wilkinson, director of Economic change working with ACEVO Consulting
Funded by: Department of Health Volunteering Fund

Description: This project conducted an independent evaluation of the Hayaan Somali Mental Health Promotion Project Programme delivered over two and a half years 2010-13, which was funded by a combination of Department of Health Volunteering Fund, Trust for London and the Social Action Fund. The Hayaan Project trained members of the Somali community to run fortnightly information and support workshops, which also engaged professionals to learn about Somali culture and beliefs. The project expanded into Brent in collaboration with Brent Mind in 2012. The report evaluates the project’s impact against its original intended outcomes and makes recommendations for future development of the project.

Head for work

Date: November 2010
Author(s): Heather Wilkinson, director of Economic change working with ACEVO Consulting
Funded by: Big Lottery Fund

Description: This project conducted an independent evaluation of the Head for Work Programme delivered over three years 2009-12, which was funded by a Big Lottery Reaching Communities Grant. The Head for Work Programme aims to increase training and employment opportunities for people with long-term mental health problems, who are unemployed. Head for Work had three elements:
1. Expert Perspectives in Training (EPIT), a train the trainer course accredited by the University of Westminster,
2. TrainAware, mental health awareness sessions delivered by graduates of EPIT,
3. Future Prospectus, 1:1 and group support for EPIT graduates to help them progress into further education, training and employment opportunities.
The report evaluates the project’s impact against its original intended outcomes and makes recommendations for future development of the project.

Somali Advocacy Research Project

Date: November 2010
Author(s): Dr Natalie Tobert, Josie Hinton
Funded by: King’s Fund

Description: The project evaluated the ‘cultural brokerage’ approach to advocacy with Somali mental health service users, carers and professionals in the borough of Harrow. It explored whether advocacy resulted in improved Somali access to mental health services and improved professional interaction with Somali people. The research explored whether the family model of advocacy was perceived to be beneficial both by the Somali community and by mental health professionals. The report makes recommendations for future policy and practice.

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